Because of the nature of our disability practice, many of our clients have existing health challenges.

With an abundance of caution during the corona-virus pandemic, our law firm is conducting all business via phone.

If you believe you need to meet with an attorney, please call and confirm before coming to our office. In order to protect our staff, we don’t want them to be exposed to unnecessary walk-ins.

Our attorneys and administrative staff will continue to work to meet your needs.

McKown & Myers, LLP

Disabled And Unable To Get Your
Benefits? We Can Help. 765-293-7901

Veterans who received an other-than-honorable discharge may still be eligible for benefits

Throughout our nation’s history, millions of men and women have served their country in the military. Sadly, many of those individuals have slipped through the cracks and have yet to receive access to the benefits that they were promised. Many of those veterans awaiting their benefits are in Indiana.

More than half a million vets have been issued other-than-honorable discharges. However, veterans are only supposed to lose their promised benefits if they are found guilty in a general court-martial, have gone AWOL or are conscientious objectors. Plenty of veterans are missing out on their benefits and do not fall into any of those categories.

Under the now-defunct “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy, more than 100,000 service members were discharged based solely on their sexual orientation. Studies indicate that these individuals are at a higher risk of committing suicide, becoming homeless or being incarcerated.

While the VA says that it is doing the best it can with the number of discharges that must be processed, the organization has still only been able to complete only 30,000 character-of-discharge determinations over the last decade. That represents a mere 7% of the half a million men and women who may be eligible for benefits.

Any individual who has served in the United States military and is still waiting for the benefits that were promised to him or her is encouraged to speak to an attorney familiar with veterans’ benefits. A lawyer may review a person’s service, the terms of his or her discharge and gather more information about where the claim stands in the VA system. At that point, an attorney can begin working with his or her client to get him or her access to the benefits he or she were promised.