Surprisingly, there is no set definition of who is a veteran in the United States. Benefits for those who have been deemed veterans in Indiana and around the country have been created and added-upon for more than 200 years. Each time the government would add a new benefit, they would also add a new requirement for a veteran to be eligible for that benefit. For those who have earned them, veteran benefits can make a true difference in their lives, and these benefits remain some of the most important reasons many choose to serve.

Most veterans in good standing are offered first availability for federal jobs. However, to be eligible, veterans must have an honorable discharge from the military, and they must be a lower rank than a major. The only way someone above the rank of general or the equivalent can be considered first for the veterans’ benefit of federal employment is if they are disabled.

The GI Bill pays for college for those who have met the serving requirement and have a favorable discharge. There are two different types of GI bills. The first is the Active Duty Montgomery GI Bill, which pays for college for up to ten years after military discharge. The second is the Post 9/11 GI Bill. This one pays for college if an active-duty military member served up to a 90-day aggregate period of service after September 11, 2001 and suffered a disability.

Eligible veterans can receive medical care through the Veterans Hospital Administration. The first qualification is an honorable discharge from the military. However, in certain cases, a dishonorable discharge may be considered. The amount of time served is also important in determining who qualifies for healthcare benefits.

For those who have served in the military and have been denied benefits, there is assistance available. Consulting an experienced veterans’ benefits attorney could help to ensure all qualified benefits are awarded at the earliest date possible.