Because of the nature of our disability practice, many of our clients have existing health challenges.

With an abundance of caution during the corona-virus pandemic, our law firm is conducting all business via phone.

If you believe you need to meet with an attorney, please call and confirm before coming to our office. In order to protect our staff, we don’t want them to be exposed to unnecessary walk-ins.

Our attorneys and administrative staff will continue to work to meet your needs.

McKown & Myers, LLP

Disabled And Unable To Get Your
Benefits? We Can Help. 765-293-7901

Veterans can receive both SSDI and VA disability benefits

Veterans often put their lives on the line to protect the United States. Unfortunately, the sacrifices they make for everyday Americans can pose challenges for them once they return home.

More than half of the military members that came back from Iraq faced severe mental health conditions, the most common being post-traumatic stress disorder. These conditions can often make it difficult for them to remain mentally stable and maintain consistent employment.

Luckily, ex-service members can qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance to help support them while still receiving benefits from Veterans Affairs.

Many veterans are currently on disability insurance

According to the United States Census Bureau, nearly 3.8 million veterans have some cognitive impairment and more than 1 million of them have a disability that prevents them from working.

Despite both SSDI and VA benefits being government programs, the requirements are not exactly the same. That’s because VA benefits are distributed on a percentage-based system while people only get SSDI if they qualify under the Social Security Administration’s standards. Another difference is that anyone can apply for SSDI, while veterans are the only ones eligible for VA benefits.

Requirements veterans need to get SSDI

These are the qualifications:

  • They must show they can’t work due to the severity of their condition.
  • Their medical ailments must last or be expected to last at least one year or will cause them to die eventually.

Veterans may also apply for what is called “closed period disability,” meaning their condition still makes them eligible for benefits but has since improved over time. To qualify, they must provide medical evidence that shows they were not able to perform a considerable amount of work for at least one year.

Veterans deserve quality care for their sacrifices

Those who devoted their lives to protect everyday Americans often don’t get much in return for their services. When veterans come home, their injuries, mental health conditions and employment instability often make it difficult for them to live a normal life.

Veterans in Indiana looking to get on SSDI may want to seek legal help. Luckily, a knowledgeable and dedicated disability attorney can answer any questions they have and help them get the benefits they need.