Because of the nature of our disability practice, many of our clients have existing health challenges.

With an abundance of caution during the corona-virus pandemic, our law firm is conducting all business via phone.

If you believe you need to meet with an attorney, please call and confirm before coming to our office. In order to protect our staff, we don’t want them to be exposed to unnecessary walk-ins.

Our attorneys and administrative staff will continue to work to meet your needs.

McKown & Myers, LLP

Disabled And Unable To Get Your
Benefits? We Can Help. 765-293-7901

Why do I need another medical test when applying for disability?

You filled out all the paperwork you needed to in order to file for Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits. You went back to your doctor’s office again, and again, for the records you needed. You think you made your case.

Then, you hear from Indiana’s Disability Determination Bureau, which renews the claim on behalf of the Social Security Administration (SSA). What you hoped was a letter notifying you that your benefits were approved instead is a request.

The employees at the Disability Determination Bureau might need more medical information before they can rule if your physical condition qualifies you as disabled under Social Security laws. If that’s the case, they’ll set up a special medical test or exam that the government will pay for. Some costs for travel to take the test also could be paid.

If you have to cancel the appointment, the Disability Determination Bureau needs to know. If you don’t inform the agency, the decision will be made without the results of the medical testing.

When you do go to the appointment, the doctor doing the exam or conducting the test only will collect the information or make the diagnosis the state has asked for. The doctor won’t write any prescriptions or treat any conditions. The doctor is a neutral third party who isn’t involved in the decision-making but will submit a report.

Once that report is received, the Disability Determination Bureau will review the findings, and considering the totality of your case, will make a decision. You’ll receive the determination by mail.

If you are denied SSD benefits after your visit to the doctor, you have the right to appeal. An attorney experienced in disability cases can review your paperwork and the doctor’s findings to help you present the best case possible for your appeal.